The Process Company

Processes are an integral part of all companies – sometimes, so integral that a company looks like an incidental outcome of its processes. The greatest benefit of having processes is, of course, the ability to be a ready excuse for any event, outcome or result.

“But sir, I was only following the company process while dealing with that customer”, “Jason, why have you not followed the escalation process for alerting senior management?”, “But….there was no process to catch this error in time”. Sounds familiar? If not, please apply for a corporate job immediately.

As with everything in life, a process is born out of chaos and the need to manage it. You go to a public office (think RMV) and you are handed a token that enters you into the first step in the process. You want a credit card – fill out the first of several dozen documents for, yes, processing. In the absence of these defined steps (a layman’s term for process), the act of getting a license or a credit card could become entirely random, subjective and confusing.

The corporate gurus have taken this to an entirely different level. In a typical office, there is a process for getting a pencil or sharpener for yourself, one (or many) more process(es) for getting approval for a flight that is 20 cents costlier than the lowest fare (though it saves 8 hours of your time) and a process for opening a new office overseas – all equally daunting to navigate. You should never assume that the process for what you may consider a trivial matter is less serious or less complex than that for making profound decisions that affect the entire organization.

What starts off as a simple procedure to streamline things, especially in a growing organization, soon becomes a death trap. Failure to win business against competition is easily blamed on processes, or lack thereof. Poor quality of software is by default attributed to insufficient and inadequate QA processes and never on the lack of skills of the developers.

The power of the process culture as a deterrent should not be underestimated. For example, if you needed to borrow the time of an IT specialist in your company to solve a desktop problem, a quick recap of the request-review-more information-review-deny-appeal-more information-deny steps in the process is enough to decide that it is much better to live with (and spread) the virus on your PC than to seek technical assistance. Of course, we are deliberately ignoring here the possibility of using your personal charm to entice the IT specialist to look at your laptop in the parking lot.

Processes follow the law of entropy – they always increase. First there is chaos in managing employee vacations. To solve this, a simple graph/chart is put up on the wall to see when who is on vacation. Then this gets incorporated as a spreadsheet on the manager’s PC. Next this is uploaded to a central point and made shareable. Everyone starts editing their own (and others’) vacation dates, making it an extremely dynamic document. Then access controls are put in place. This leads to the inability for anyone to get his or her vacation information into the system (yes, it is now a ‘system’) in a timely manner for lack of access privileges. Then comes a complex process of applying for vacation (in a different system, naturally) with associated approval workflow that, if and when successful, will feed the details into the system hosting the vacation chart……… (please feel free to take this up for your Ph.D thesis).